New Pattern: Khajiit Cowl

Khajiit Cowl

Life got in the way a great number of times, but I’m happy to present the Khajiit Cowl. If you read this blog you probably know I love to play video games, one of them being Skyrim. While roaming through the wildly beautiful nature (in Skyrim of course), killing giants, meeting merchants, picking herbs and flowers, an idea began to form in my head. It wasn’t until I came across a hank of Cascade Eco+ that the shapes started to become clear. Something textured, something with a lot of cables. Something, that was a combination between a cowl, a hoodie and a cape.

I named it after the Khajiit (a cat-like species that walk around in Skyrim), who work as merchants (or thieves). In all honesty, this cowl is mostly inspired by my favorite Khajiit: M’aiq the Liar. As an ode to him I’ll share one of my favorite quotes of him:

“Snow falls. Why worry where it goes. M’aiq thinks the snowflakes are pretty.”

Khajiit Cowl

I love scarves, shawls and cowls, but what I find lacking in these items is the ability to pull them over your head when it’s very windy or rainy. You’ll always end up either exposing your neck, or you have to unwrap your accessory to rewrap it around your hair. (I know I’m exaggerating a little bit, but I like warm neck and ears when it’s windy and I’m lazy so I like to do everything in one motion :))

Khajiit Cowl

The Khajiit Cowl is very versatile. It was designed to keep your head, neck and shoulders warm at the same time. You can wear it either on top of your coat, or underneath. You can also fold the top part inward and wear it as a cowl and pull it over your head if it starts to rain.

Khajiit Cowl

If you wear it underneath your coat there won’t be any raindrops going down your neck if it suddenly starts to rain (it’s a theme.. I live in the Netherlands, we get a lot of unexpected rain showers..)

Khajiit Cowl

But most importantly I guess is the feeling of walking through the wild lands of Skyrim while wearing this cowl and pulling it over your head like you’re some magic wielding student of the College of Winterhold πŸ™‚

So about the pattern..
The cowl shown in these pictures was knit using 2 hanks of Cascade Eco+, and was knit with 5.5mm/ US9 needles for a tighter gauge. It’s heavy weight for something like his, and I’m happy to say I’m working on a lightweight version as well, which will be more drapey and elegant. I will update the pattern when this version is up for release so if you’ve already bought the pattern you will receive an email with the update.

The pattern is written for one size, but the fit can be adjusted by changing the amount of the stitches for one of the charts.

lilirious_khajiit_pattern

Angora bunnies…

I’v been away again, but this time I had a very good reason. My tiny household has grown with two more little fuzzballs. I adopted two baby angora bunnies (well.. they’re dwarfs, so I guess you’d say one of them is like a Teddy Widder and the other one is like a a cross between a Teddy Widder and a Jersey Woolley). I’m not sure if that’s entirely correct though. I’m not sure if those other bunnies produce angora wool, but these two bunnies do.

my baby angora bunnies

At the moment they’re 9 weeks old and tiny (but verrry hairy). I named the floppy white one Bam and the other one Zuzu. They say that little rabbits only need 1 square meter, but I find that a bit too small. They’re very active and hopping around constantly. It’s a real treat to watch them hop about and have these wild moments.

my baby angora bunnies

The cats like them as well, but they keep their distance. They like to watch, but so far I haven’t seen anything that gave me cause for worry. Potty training them has been a lot of fun as well! No pee anywhere! Just a few random pellets that failed to end up in the potty. No big deal πŸ™‚

my baby angora bunnies

Next week (at 10 weeks old) they’re ready for their first haircut. I’ve come to understand that babyhair isn’t really useful, but I’m still both excited and horrified at the thought of clipping them next week. I’ve been brushing them daily and it’s become less of a battle every day. I’ve kept it very playful, but some poop got stuck under their feet and I had to cut it away. Let’s just say that they weren’t very happy with me that day πŸ˜›

angora fiber

I had told the breeder that I’d like to spin the fiber, so she gave me a very large bag of old clippings from her angora’s. There’s a lot of different colors in there and it all feels so incredibly soft! I’ve tried spinning some and I’ve tried blending some of it with some BFL I had. I also ordered some black and gray alpaca to use for blending. I also tried spinning some pure 100% angora. It’s so incredibly soft! It doesn’t have much memory, but it’s very drapey. I might use it for a shawl or scarf, but I think I’d still ply it with some silk or something else.

swatching angora fiber

The whole angora spinning brought me back to spinning on my russian spindle. I really love the spindle, but there’s one (rather big) drawback. The wooden tip causes a little too much friction, so when the cop is building up, my fingers start to hurt. I’m a bit paranoid when it comes to my fingers and wrists because most of my family has had surgery on their hands/ wrists. I guess it’s a family defect, but we all tend to lean towards carpal tunnel syndrome, and I’m extremely paranoid when I feel any strain at all. On the other hand it’s not really a way to live. For example: I don’t use screwdrivers because it puts a lot of strain on my wrists. So for every little thing I pull out the drill. Again. Paranoid. I know.

Anyway, I found out that one of the ladies in one of the Dutch spinning groups on Ravelry makes spindles with glass tips. I fell in love with one, and before I knew it the postman rang twice.

My new spindle!

She sent me a merino/ silk/ firestar as well (which I totally did not expect) and I’ve been blissfully spinning away. Don’t you just love the colors? I love blue πŸ™‚

My new spindle!

My new spindle!

Something else (also blue) is the lazy lopi KAL I joined by Penelope Craft. Pick a sweater pattern, pick a color (obviously Lopi), and be done somewhere in the end of October. I’m knitting a Spruce Cove PulloverΒ for my BIL, and he’s chosen blue. He was looking for something warm, and I’m not sure if anything gets warmer than wool from Iceland. Knitting Lopi is very nice because my hands stay warm while knitting.

I really don’t think I’ll need that much time. I honestly think this sweater will b e done by the end of this week. Netflix and knitting go well together!

FO: Juneberry triangle

It’s finally done! I think this is one of the quickest spinning projects I’ve ever done. I’ve loved the pattern since I first saw it, but I never felt comfortable enough to try ‘true lace’. Now that I’ve done it though, I feel as though true lace is so much more fun than regular lace projects. Knitting shawls and scarfs is such a bore when you’re plowing through the neverending purls on the wrong side of the project.. ugh.

FO: handspun juneberry triangle

I love the pattern and I love how the yarn turned out. The pattern called for a heavier weight yarn, but I think it worked out just fine in the end πŸ™‚

FO: handspun juneberry triangle

I tried to snap some artsy pictures, but I’m not sure about my artistic photography skills. Maybe I should just stick to the normal kind of pictures I snap. I do love the sky behind this picture.

FO: handspun juneberry triangle

I know triangular, lacey shawls don’t usually work well with variegated or mutli-colored yarns, but I think I’m willing to make an exception for this project. I’m probably biased because this project is ‘my baby’, and it probably really doesn’t look all that good. I’m willing to ignore that though (sorry :)).

I’m a newbie dyer myself and I honestly love the color and blend of these rolags (see previous post). Now that it’s all spun and knitted up it reminds me of the sky and clouds. I think this shawl really represents this summer for me, and I think I’ll wear it a lot this fall/ winter πŸ™‚

FO: handspun juneberry triangle

I really love this pattern, and I’m sure I’ll try knitting another one as well. It’s a very interesting pattern and the lace is not all that scary at all. Just make sure you really read the instructions πŸ™‚